Animals should be spared cruel tests by the cosmetic industry, says S&D MEP Miriam Dalli

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Health & Consumers

Press release

In many countries outside of Europe, animals are still submitted to painful experiments to produce new lipsticks or shampoos. Rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, rats and mice are commonly submitted to such experiments for tests mostly related to skin and eye irritation.
 
The European Union has proved that these cruel tests are unnecessary, and this is why the S&D Group has promoted a resolution, voted on today by the European Parliament, calling for a global ban on animal testing on cosmetics and toiletries.
 
The European Union stopped the testing of finished cosmetic products on animals in 2004, and ingredients in 2009. This was followed up in 2013 with a ban on the importation and sale of any new cosmetics tested elsewhere on animals. However, some 80% of the United Nations countries still allow these tests.
 
S&D MEP Miriam Dalli, who is the S&D author of the resolution, said:
 
“More than half a million animals are used annually in worldwide cosmetics testing. This suffering is unnecessary and it is wrong. Alternative testing methods are very advanced, to the extent that non-animal methods are more accurate. Humane alternatives to animal tests can include simple organisms like bacteria or human tissues and cells, as well as sophisticated computer models. It simply makes no sense to continue causing unjustified pain to animals.
 
“The phasing out of animal testing is possible. We have proven it in Europe. Now we want the EU to promote a global ban based on the EU’s Cosmetics Regulation. Europe has already answered to the ethical concerns of its citizens and I am sure that many people outside of Europe will support an international initiative to stop this cruelty.
 
“We know that it will not be easy to change international rules and regulations. Some influential states and regions, including some members of the International Committee of Cosmetics Regulation (ICCR), do not yet have bans in place.
 
“We hope to see this item included in the next meeting of the UN General Assembly taking place in New York this September. We have asked the Commission to consider the possibility of organising side events at this meeting to enable discussion among actors on the benefits and merits of an international convention against the testing of animals for cosmetics.”